Mike Chaney's Tech Corner

Technical Discussions => Camera Accessories => Topic started by: Fred A on July 25, 2009, 07:26:57 AM



Title: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Fred A on July 25, 2009, 07:26:57 AM
I was told... fact or fiction, that I should turn off the camera, change lenses indoors or at least out of the wind, put the new lens on the camera body first, camel hair brush the back of the lens that is coming off, and put the rear cap on.
So far, I have been very lucky with no dust specks showing up.

Anyone with better tips on procedure?.
Fred


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Ya Me on July 25, 2009, 08:16:45 AM
[quote ]
I was told... Anyone with better tips on procedure?.[/quote]

I was told ... you could buy a different camera for each lens.
Then you wouldn't have to change your Lens  ;D

Ya Me



Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Fred A on July 25, 2009, 08:23:40 AM
Quote
was told ... you could buy a different camera for each lens.

This happens to be true among the pros.
They actually hang 2 or three cameras over the shoulder for quick access.
Good point!!

Next time I sell one of my oil wells, I'll remember that. :-))
Fred


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Ya Me on July 25, 2009, 08:43:39 AM

Quote
Next time I sell one of my oil wells, I'll remember that. :-))

Don't foret to share  :)

Ya Me


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Seth on July 25, 2009, 08:51:50 AM
I used to carry three, but it is TOO cumbersome.  Actually, carrying two isn't because of lens switching; it's about rapid access where a lens change would cause you to miss the shot.  The other reason is a strobe on the shorter lens (though the SB900 supposedly goes to 200mm range.)  Lenses are still changed outside and it is done rather quickly, usually without looking.  I change in the open, though in high wind/sand in Iraq I got in a vehicle to change.

What lenses are changed depends on the event/sport.  Usually one box carries a 70-200/2.8 or longer.  The other has 28-70/2.8 or 17-55/2.8; that is where the changes usually occur.

Yes, all manufacturers recommend turning off the camera.  They even recommended it in the film days.  Keeps a charge from being on the sensor.    Too much switching on and off--and forgetting.  Personally, I keep rear lens caps on the ones I take off the box.  Many people (not all) treat the employers' cameras worse than they would their own.  I buy mine.

Dust used to get in other places on the body.  These are mostly sealed now, even from moisture, by Nikon, Canon, etc.  Lens shades and UV filters save the front elements.

Bottom line, if you have time and want to save your lens mounts, turn it off and watch while you do it.  But, it's not as great a dust magnet as maufacturers make it out to be.

BTW--brushing the lens is NOT a good idea initially.  If you watch the Canon and Nikon repair folks clean cameras, usually you will see them blow the lens off before any brushing.  Then lens cleaner on the tissues.  


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Fred A on July 25, 2009, 09:10:13 AM
Quote
If you watch the Canon and Nikon repair folks clean cameras, usually you will see them blow the lens off before any brushing

I tried that, but got spit on the lens every time!  ;)
Fred


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Seth on July 25, 2009, 09:43:46 AM
I tried that, but got spit on the lens every time!  

Done indoors.  Canned air.  BUT, must be used carefully.  The propellant can destroy the lens coating.  For cleaning sensors, the can is left on the table and the camera is moved around.

Non-spit technique in a pinch:  blow hard out of your mouth two long blows, then do one on the lens.  No spit.

The "fun" emergency lens cleaner (only do one lens a day!): A shot of whiskey then huff--not blow--on the lens.  Clean the condensation immediately.  Not a joke, it works.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: admin on July 25, 2009, 10:42:59 AM
The process I use is:

  • Use canned air to blow around the lens that is currently on the camera: blow around the seal between the camera and lens
  • Use canned air to blow off the back of the lens I'm about to put on the camera
  • With the lens pointing at the floor, remove the lens that is on the camera and set it down
  • If the camera has an automated lens cleaning/vibration on the menu that can be used with the lens off, use it now with the camera still pointing down
  • With the camera lens opening still pointing downward, screw the new lens onto the camera

The first two steps tend to get rid of most of the debris that would normally fall into the camera as you remove/install the lens and holding the camera downward prevents most of the larger particles from entering the camera.

Mike


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: BrianPrice on July 27, 2009, 03:47:38 AM
An air blower is safer and more environmentally friendly than canned air - this sort of thing:

  http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/541904-REG/Giottos_AA1903_Rocket_Air_Blower_.html (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/541904-REG/Giottos_AA1903_Rocket_Air_Blower_.html)

Canned air contains nasty chemicals as a propellent - see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_duster (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_duster)

Brian


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Seth on July 27, 2009, 08:28:31 AM
Yes, but...

I just watched two Canon techs do all the pro gear turned in for "clean and check," with canned air--including mirrors and sensors.  Lenses get the standard Kimwipes and lens cleaner after blowing off.  

It's their standard kit.



Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: BrianPrice on July 27, 2009, 09:36:41 AM
I just watched two Canon techs do all the pro gear turned in for "clean and check," with canned air--including mirrors and sensors.  Lenses get the standard Kimwipes and lens cleaner after blowing off.  

Just goes to prove how environmentally flawed Canon are  ;)

Brian


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Seth on July 27, 2009, 10:07:10 AM
Brian-

Not picking on Canon.  Nikon does the same.  Seen them both.  My guess is all manufacturers do likewise. 

A lot depends on what the propellant is and I do NOT know that.  The cans were not the standard labeled (over priced!) crap that Staples, Office Depot, Wally World sells.

Whatever it is doesn't affect front-silvered mirrors, lens coatings or digital sensors.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: admin on July 27, 2009, 10:22:18 AM
An air blower is safer and more environmentally friendly than canned air - this sort of thing:

  http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/541904-REG/Giottos_AA1903_Rocket_Air_Blower_.html (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/541904-REG/Giottos_AA1903_Rocket_Air_Blower_.html)

Canned air contains nasty chemicals as a propellent - see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_duster (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_duster)

Brian

Right.  I'm not advocating using canned air to blow on the sensor, but I do recommend it for blowing off the back of the lens or around the body/lens!  The little bulb blowers are not very useful at dislodging the more stubborn debris.  They're just not strong enough.  There are ways to safely use canned air to clean a sensor but much care and technique must be used: start the air before pointing it into the body, don't get close to the sensor, don't shut the air off while blowing into the body, etc.

Mike


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: UltraChrome on July 27, 2009, 10:29:35 AM
To avoid the propellant in canned air, I use the American Recorder CO2 system. Works great, especially at those dirt bike races!

http://americanrecorder.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=10


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: wingspar on August 03, 2009, 02:44:35 PM
Canned air around my camera and lenses makes me cringe.  On the outside of the body and lens if it is really dirty, ok, but never lens elements.  Thatís where a Rocket Blower, soft camels hair brush and or a soft micro fiber cloth for stubborn areas come in handy.  The Rocket Blower works for sensor dust too.

If I do use canned air on a sensitive part, and I have done it, tho it makes me cringe, I place the can on a flat surface, and move the object Iím cleaning around.  That way, the chances of squirting some of the propellent in the can are greatly reduced.

My camera is always off when changing lenses.  I currently have 5 bodies, and using 3 at the same time at some events is the most efficient way to cover the event.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: admin on August 05, 2009, 09:31:57 AM
Canned air around my camera and lenses makes me cringe.  On the outside of the body and lens if it is really dirty, ok, but never lens elements.  Thatís where a Rocket Blower, soft camels hair brush and or a soft micro fiber cloth for stubborn areas come in handy.  The Rocket Blower works for sensor dust too.

I like the canned air that is just pressurized clean/filtered air with no oils or other additives: designed for sensor cleaning and such.  Rocket blowers can only blow what they "inhale": dirty, potentially humid air.  There's always the chance of sucking in dust particles and then accelerating them into the sensor/lens.

Mike


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: wingspar on August 05, 2009, 12:47:38 PM
I like the canned air that is just pressurized clean/filtered air with no oils or other additives: designed for sensor cleaning and such. 

All canned air Iíve ever used has a propellent that squirts out when the can isnít held level.  Not good for sensors.  What kind of canned air does not use this propellent?

A Rocket Blower is my only method of cleaning a sensor.  Iíve only wet cleaned once over the last 6 years, and some 8 different bodies.  Iíve never seen the Rocket Blower add dust.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Seth on August 10, 2009, 04:55:32 PM
All canned air Iíve ever used has a propellent that squirts out when the can isnít held level.  Not good for sensors.  What kind of canned air does not use this propellent?

A Rocket Blower is my only method of cleaning a sensor.  Iíve only wet cleaned once over the last 6 years, and some 8 different bodies.  Iíve never seen the Rocket Blower add dust.

Gary-
The technique Mike and I talked about earlier is what you need to do.  Set the can on the table.  Give it a quick shot (to nowhere) to make sure there is no propellant.  Then do the mirror lockup and move the camera in front of the steady can.  That's what the camera techs do.  Practice a couple of shots on glass or a mirror to see that you have it figured out.

Seth


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Eljae on August 27, 2009, 09:48:42 AM
I am not sure if I am a good guy or a bad guy...global warming, manufacturer production process... :-[

I use this:  btw, I have no commercial interest in this site and only post it for reference, and I don't clean my sensors, only the glass and around the camera body before changing lenses.  

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/534197-REG/American_Recorder_CO_51100_CO_2_Dust_and_Particle.html

Good sense of humor Fred, p.s. I do carry 3 cameras on the job (2 on me and 1 as my backup), but I rarely change lenses on the job, except when I am in my oil field  :).


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Seth on August 27, 2009, 10:16:20 AM
I'd be REALLY worried about blowing things apart with that.  I'd NEVER use it inside the camera.  Those cartridges are what are used to power hi-powered BB guns.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Eljae on August 27, 2009, 12:09:49 PM
They are designed for this use.  That said, you do need to use care with it, like don't jam the nozzle into your gear. The velocity is not as high as most canned air, but its fast, compact and convenient. 

Again, I only use it on outside surfaces, but I suppose its not for everyone.  It runs out quick too.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: hedwards on October 06, 2009, 09:01:50 AM
I have to admit that I kind of cringe when people suggest using canned air or otherwise pressurized air to clean a sensor. You don't have to be quite as paranoid about cleaning a sensor as one might think due to the fact that most cameras will have a filter mounted right over the top of the sensor that stays in place constantly.

However you do still need to be careful not to make the particles stick and to make sure that you're not scratching the filter. The main risk from the canned air is basically sandblasting and residue. As well as accidentally forcing particles into places in the body that they're not supposed to be.

If you're really, paranoid about dust, you can always get one of those portable clean rooms that are forthcoming. http://photipherals.com/?page_id=11

Cleaning the lenses themselves is largely another matter, you're mostly concerned about removing particles before wiping down the lens and with damaging the coating that most lenses these days have.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Seth on October 06, 2009, 03:13:59 PM
Cleaning the lenses themselves is largely another matter, you're mostly concerned about removing particles before wiping down the lens and with damaging the coating that most lenses these days have.

IMHO anybody without either a UV or just clear, optically flat filter over their lens deserves what they get. 

The exception to my statement is with lenses like the 12-24 where it is not physically possible.  I keep that in a Domke wrap when not in use.  The lens shade is the only protection.


Title: Re: DSLR lens changing
Post by: Greatwhitewing on May 14, 2018, 07:11:11 PM
I was told... fact or fiction, that I should turn off the camera, change lenses indoors or at least out of the wind, put the new lens on the camera body first, camel hair brush the back of the lens that is coming off, and put the rear cap on.
So far, I have been very lucky with no dust specks showing up.

Anyone with better tips on procedure?.
Fred

Turning off the camera is probably safer but I have done it both ways without negative results. I have access to Canon 500D, 80D and 7D2 and have done it both ways on all 3.
I try to be extremely  careful outdoors with wind and dust but I fear moisture getting trapped in the lens from the mount side far more. Fungus is death to a lens. Dust can be tolerated from functioning and image quality.

The camel hair brush is fine but keep clear of the mirror, most fragile part of your camera. Those first surface mirrors are extremely delicate. Advised not use anything other that clean air.