Mike Chaney's Tech Corner
October 23, 2018, 04:47:13 PM *
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Author Topic: DSLR lens changing  (Read 39773 times)
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« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2009, 09:31:57 AM »

Canned air around my camera and lenses makes me cringe.  On the outside of the body and lens if it is really dirty, ok, but never lens elements.  Thatís where a Rocket Blower, soft camels hair brush and or a soft micro fiber cloth for stubborn areas come in handy.  The Rocket Blower works for sensor dust too.

I like the canned air that is just pressurized clean/filtered air with no oils or other additives: designed for sensor cleaning and such.  Rocket blowers can only blow what they "inhale": dirty, potentially humid air.  There's always the chance of sucking in dust particles and then accelerating them into the sensor/lens.

Mike
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« Reply #16 on: August 05, 2009, 12:47:38 PM »

I like the canned air that is just pressurized clean/filtered air with no oils or other additives: designed for sensor cleaning and such. 

All canned air Iíve ever used has a propellent that squirts out when the can isnít held level.  Not good for sensors.  What kind of canned air does not use this propellent?

A Rocket Blower is my only method of cleaning a sensor.  Iíve only wet cleaned once over the last 6 years, and some 8 different bodies.  Iíve never seen the Rocket Blower add dust.
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« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2009, 04:55:32 PM »

All canned air Iíve ever used has a propellent that squirts out when the can isnít held level.  Not good for sensors.  What kind of canned air does not use this propellent?

A Rocket Blower is my only method of cleaning a sensor.  Iíve only wet cleaned once over the last 6 years, and some 8 different bodies.  Iíve never seen the Rocket Blower add dust.

Gary-
The technique Mike and I talked about earlier is what you need to do.  Set the can on the table.  Give it a quick shot (to nowhere) to make sure there is no propellant.  Then do the mirror lockup and move the camera in front of the steady can.  That's what the camera techs do.  Practice a couple of shots on glass or a mirror to see that you have it figured out.

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« Reply #18 on: August 27, 2009, 09:48:42 AM »

I am not sure if I am a good guy or a bad guy...global warming, manufacturer production process... Embarrassed

I use this:  btw, I have no commercial interest in this site and only post it for reference, and I don't clean my sensors, only the glass and around the camera body before changing lenses.  

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/534197-REG/American_Recorder_CO_51100_CO_2_Dust_and_Particle.html

Good sense of humor Fred, p.s. I do carry 3 cameras on the job (2 on me and 1 as my backup), but I rarely change lenses on the job, except when I am in my oil field  Smiley.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2009, 10:04:56 AM by Eljae » Logged
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« Reply #19 on: August 27, 2009, 10:16:20 AM »

I'd be REALLY worried about blowing things apart with that.  I'd NEVER use it inside the camera.  Those cartridges are what are used to power hi-powered BB guns.
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« Reply #20 on: August 27, 2009, 12:09:49 PM »

They are designed for this use.  That said, you do need to use care with it, like don't jam the nozzle into your gear. The velocity is not as high as most canned air, but its fast, compact and convenient. 

Again, I only use it on outside surfaces, but I suppose its not for everyone.  It runs out quick too.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2009, 12:25:57 PM by Eljae » Logged
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« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2009, 09:01:50 AM »

I have to admit that I kind of cringe when people suggest using canned air or otherwise pressurized air to clean a sensor. You don't have to be quite as paranoid about cleaning a sensor as one might think due to the fact that most cameras will have a filter mounted right over the top of the sensor that stays in place constantly.

However you do still need to be careful not to make the particles stick and to make sure that you're not scratching the filter. The main risk from the canned air is basically sandblasting and residue. As well as accidentally forcing particles into places in the body that they're not supposed to be.

If you're really, paranoid about dust, you can always get one of those portable clean rooms that are forthcoming. http://photipherals.com/?page_id=11

Cleaning the lenses themselves is largely another matter, you're mostly concerned about removing particles before wiping down the lens and with damaging the coating that most lenses these days have.
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« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2009, 03:13:59 PM »

Cleaning the lenses themselves is largely another matter, you're mostly concerned about removing particles before wiping down the lens and with damaging the coating that most lenses these days have.

IMHO anybody without either a UV or just clear, optically flat filter over their lens deserves what they get. 

The exception to my statement is with lenses like the 12-24 where it is not physically possible.  I keep that in a Domke wrap when not in use.  The lens shade is the only protection.
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« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2018, 07:11:11 PM »

I was told... fact or fiction, that I should turn off the camera, change lenses indoors or at least out of the wind, put the new lens on the camera body first, camel hair brush the back of the lens that is coming off, and put the rear cap on.
So far, I have been very lucky with no dust specks showing up.

Anyone with better tips on procedure?.
Fred

Turning off the camera is probably safer but I have done it both ways without negative results. I have access to Canon 500D, 80D and 7D2 and have done it both ways on all 3.
I try to be extremely  careful outdoors with wind and dust but I fear moisture getting trapped in the lens from the mount side far more. Fungus is death to a lens. Dust can be tolerated from functioning and image quality.

The camel hair brush is fine but keep clear of the mirror, most fragile part of your camera. Those first surface mirrors are extremely delicate. Advised not use anything other that clean air.
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