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Author Topic: Dell U2410 calibration  (Read 153830 times)
Adam
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« on: October 21, 2009, 05:49:53 PM »

Nedd your help.
Just received U2410 monitor and it is calibrated at the factory as you can see from attached image. Also, Dell says that it cannot reproduce calibration data just in case.
Should I attempt to calibrate it with EZColor and OptixXR? I think that they used better equipment to calibrate it, than what I have. Affraid to mess up, even though I calibrated my Sony and CRT's before.
Advise please. Maybe Mike can say something here.
Thank you!
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Terry-M
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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2009, 06:03:12 PM »

Adam, you should calibrate your monitor with the pc (graphics card) it is used with. Values are stored in the card's look-up-table (LUT) which set things every time the computer is booted up.
I see that Dell say on their calibration the average deltaE is < 5. Well, 5 is not very good; even with a cheap monitor I achieved < 3 with my own calibration. I get < 1 with my Eizo monitor. I was told by Gretag Mcbeth that <3.5 is satisfactory.
I'm sure you'll get good results with your kit  Grin
Terry.
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Adam
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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2009, 12:49:49 AM »

I just calibrated my monitor. Could you please look at this attachment and tell me if I obtained good results according to this.
Also could you please tell me what it all means.
Thank you!
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Terry-M
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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2009, 08:13:38 AM »

Adam,
The luminance values do not look right to me. For an LCD monitor the "normal" white luminance is 120cd/m2, in other words your screen is too bright.
I would have expected a lower value for black luminance too but that may be affected by the the high brightness setting.
For comparison, see the attached results from my Eye One 2 Display calibration.
It's not uncommon for the factory settings to be very bright, however I'd tend to leave the contrast setting alone; my monitor is set at 50% contrast and I leave it there.

I'm not familiar with the EZ Color software but you should be able to set you White luminance in the calibration process, maybe it's the in "advanced" mode.
Hopefully there is someone else on the forum with the same device and software who can help.
Terry.
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Adam
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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2009, 01:19:00 PM »

I'm a little confused calibrating this monitor. It has RGB and Adobe color choices. In addition under custom color tab it has GAIN, SATURATION, HUE and OFFSET. Which of those should I use calibrating? Also, how does room lightning affect brightness? Never had such a problem before.
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Terry-M
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« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2009, 04:32:08 PM »

Quote
I'm a little confused calibrating this monitor. It has RGB and Adobe color choices. In addition under custom color tab it has GAIN, SATURATION, HUE and OFFSET. Which of those should I use calibrating?
You need to read the manual, assuming you got one with the monitor; it may be on a CD that came with it, if not you can download it here:
http://support.ap.dell.com/support/edocs/monitors/U2410W/en/index.htm
It's an html document, unzip & copy contents to a folder and then double click the index.htm file.
I had a quick glance, RGB is something to do with how it's connected DVI or analogue I think. I assume Adobe color is a preset for the colour space rather than using an actual profile made by calibration.
You really need to read this and get familiar with the calibration software and the section that allows you to set brightness (luminance).
Quote
In addition under custom color tab it has GAIN, SATURATION, HUE and OFFSET
The gain controls (if it's like mine) allow you to set RGB individually and set the colour temperature (6500K say). This is not essential because if specified at the start of calibration, it should be set by the graphics card LUT values. Doing it manually just means there's less adjustment for the Graphics card to do.
SATURATION, HUE and OFFSET I would leave alone.
Your main problem is to get that brightness to a sensible level.
I found a review of the software here:
http://www.camerahobby.com/Digital_MonacoEZ_Color_OptixXR.htm
You can see that one of the early screens in the process asks if you want to "calibrate & profile" or just "profile". You need to choose the former which will allow you to adjust the brightness in the process.
I hope that gets you a little further in your set up & calibration  Grin
Terry.
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Quote
Also, how does room lightning affect brightness?
While calibrating, as long as there is no strong light falling on the screen, all should be well.
As far as viewing, the brighter the ambient light the brighter the screen needs to be and visa-versa. Some screens have a sensor that adjusts the brightness automatically, when that is the case, the feature should be turned off during calibration.
T
« Last Edit: October 22, 2009, 06:01:06 PM by Terry-M » Logged
Adam
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« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2009, 02:18:34 AM »

I talk to X-rite tech support and after that I re-calibrated.
So far I got to 139 cd/m, if I get to 120 my monitor will be very dim, brightness at maybe 20%. How does contrast affect brightness in this equation? I guess I will have to find another way than adjusting brightness itself to reduce "brightness". I was told by tech support that Dell monitors are in general very bright.
Overall, I'm happy with my monitor though.
Thank you for taking your time to help me!
P.S.
I also ask tech support that maybe I should trade in my Optix-XR for better unit and he said that in all honesty I'll be wasting my money, Optix is an excellent colorimeter.
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Terry-M
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« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2009, 07:56:00 AM »

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I talk to X-rite tech support and after that I re-calibrated.
But did you "calibrate & profile" or just "profile"? If the former what did you set as the target value for white luminance?
Quote
So far I got to 139 cd/m, if I get to 120 my monitor will be very dim, brightness at maybe 20%.
The brightness % setting is not a measure of the "brightness"; 139cd/m2 is, which a is little on high side. At least 139 is much better than the original 327  Cheesy.
I suspect that the gain values are set too high on your monitor; if they were a little lower, you would get 120cd/m2 with a reasonable brightness setting %. However 20% still leaves plenty of margin to turn it down.

You are likely to get dark prints compared to what an image looks like on screen; you then will need to turn the brightness down to match your prints - and then re-print. I like to work with the numbers during calibartion, it's more consistent than working by eye.  Wink

Quote
How does contrast affect brightness in this equation?
What was your resulting Black luminance? 0.2cd/m2 or less would indicate good contrast I think. My old cheap monitor gave 0.2, my new Eizo gives 0.1 for comparison.
Quote
I was told by tech support that Dell monitors are in general very bright.
That applies to the factory settings of many monitors, that is why they need full calibration for photographic work IMHO.  Roll Eyes
Terry.
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Adam
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« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2009, 02:42:09 PM »

After so many tries I got this result now. Should I be happy now?
Thank you again for all your help.
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Terry-M
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« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2009, 03:03:17 PM »

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Should I be happy now?
I think so  Grin
When I first started calibrating monitors, it took some time for me to get the hang of it wrt getting the brightness setting right. When I had a new monitor a few months ago, I still had to try different settings to get the optimum result.
LCD monitors are normally quite stable but I suggest you calibrate on a regular basis. I have been told (by a colour management specialist) that the back light takes a few hours of use to "burn in" so another calibration after the first few weeks of use would be a good thing to do.
Enjoy your new screen, you'll see your photos in a new light  Grin
Terry.
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Fred A
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« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2009, 06:36:22 PM »

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you'll see your photos in a new light

GROAN!    That was terrible!
Fred  Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes
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Adam
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« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2009, 08:22:33 PM »

GROAN!    That was terrible!
Fred  Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes

I don't get it what was terrible?
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Terry-M
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« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2009, 09:17:56 PM »

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I don't get it what was terrible?
When you've been on this forum for a little longer you'll get used to Fred's sense of humour   Huh
He was referring to my little pun:
Quote
Enjoy your new screen, you'll see your photos in a new light  Grin
  Roll Eyes
Terry.
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Dirk
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« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2009, 01:14:43 PM »

After so many tries I got this result now. Should I be happy now?
Thank you again for all your help.

I'm facing the same problems with the same monitor (but using Spyder3 to calibrate)... how did you finally set the settings (color space, brightness, contrast, others) to achive the goal?

Is yours attached to a desktop or a laptop?
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Adam
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« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2009, 06:04:04 PM »

Mine is attached to desktop.
Basically, play with brightness (about 30%), contrast (about 50%) and then gain to control 3 color (RGB).
However, I have another question.
What is the ideal luminance to strive for and how close a range to 6500K can (should) you get during calibration on the best monitor?
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