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Author Topic: Hard Disk replacement.  (Read 32941 times)
Jeff
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« on: August 28, 2010, 08:05:39 AM »

Medion comp. running Vista.  500gig HD, all images stored on two external HD.  The internal Disk is in a bit of a mess partition wise, my fault, I did it.

I usually install a new hard disk after 2/3 years and the original disk is kept as a backup copy of the entire system as at that date - just in case.

I have an older comp. with XP which is used for all general stuff, the Vista is used only for images. (until it goes the way of all things)

The XP is full of progs and all manner of rubbish but continues to take all I can through at it.

A couple of weeks ago I put an extra 1gig of sheep in the Medion Vista (now 3gig total) and Qimage speeded up noticeably.

Now thinking about a new hard disk for it - the current one can be heard working hard almost all the time.

I could just fit new and clone the existing over but this would just copy any problems.

There is 45Gig in C:\

Options available seem to be.

Fit new disk, clone old system over and attempt a clean up whilst original is available as a fall back

Fit new 'standard' disk, and start again with the Recovery CD.  I have never done this before and wonder what problems there likely to be.

Fit new solid state 60Gig disk and start again from Recovery.

I have googled the subject but just get more confused. 

My usual procedure with any thing is to just jump in with both feet but wonder if any body has suggestions.  Fred/Terry??

Jeff





 
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Fred A
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2010, 09:59:56 AM »

Jeff,
Good morning/afternoon
I think Terry is out picture taking today, but I believe we of the same mind on this issue.
I have tried many backup programs in the past; from Digital tape, Drive Image, Ghost, about everything I could find.
I have made hard drive backups on Cds DVDs tape and even floppies years ago.
As you can tell, I advocate image backups.
I found Acronis True Image Home to be the most reliable backup software I have ever used (by far) and I have been using it (and buying upgrades) for about 6 years.

There are essentially two choices for me. I can make a backup image file, or I can make a clone copy.

The software has many options for other such as backup incremental, and on the fly, etc.
I found, for my needs, backup image files are for me.
An image file is a single file backup of your hard drive including the partition and which is stored on a different Hard Drive, in case the C: drive is wearing out.
I install my new HD, slip my RESCUE CD into the CD drive, (You make the RESCUE CD from the program) and reboot.
If the computer BIOS is set up properly, the computer will boot from the CD drive before the C: drive, and you run the RESTORE program which reads and installs your backup image file on the new drive.

I don't use the clone system because that makes the backup drive into a clone of the C: drive, and allows one backed up date to be cloned.
The image backup system that I prefer allows me to make a backup every night, storing about a dozen days of backups.

BTW, retrieving a few individual files is a snap too. If I accidentally deleted a picture or a folder, I can retrieve just that from any one of my backups in the blink of an eye.

So bottom line, I would get a copy of Acronis True Image Home, make a backup of the current C: drive before it dies, replace the drive, and restore the saved image back onto the new drive.

An interesting side note. They offer, and I bought it, an extra program which adds to the True Image that proclaims to be able to use an image backup and restore it to (almost) any new computer even if the configuration is different.
That was never an option before.

Haven't tried it, but software people never lie!!

This image backup system that I favor also is a safety net for any contracted viruses or worms.
Simply restore from a backup that you deem virus free from the days of saved backups, and you are healthy again.

I back up about 80 gigs (64 bit W7 Quad core) in about 10 minutes. So I don't find it tedious. I start the backup and go for my ice cream and cookies in the kitchen.

You will likely get other suggestions, and hear them out. Likely some better and easier than my solution.

Fred
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Jeff
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2010, 11:04:20 AM »

Jeff,
Good morning/afternoon
I think Terry is out picture taking today, but I believe we of the same mind on this issue.
I have tried many backup programs in the past; from Digital tape, Drive Image, Ghost, about everything I could find.
I have made hard drive backups on Cds DVDs tape and even floppies years ago.
As you can tell, I advocate image backups.
I found Acronis True Image Home to be the most reliable backup software I have ever used (by far) and I have been using it (and buying upgrades) for about 6 years.

Fred

Thanks for all that info.

It rung a bell. Looked on my XP installed progs data base and there is a 2006 Ver 7 True Image installed.  I have never used it and suspect it was a free download from a magazine, out dated ver. as we say in the UK 'a sprat to catch a Mackerel'

I have looked them up and there is an update option for 24 so will keep it in mind

Jeff   
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BrianPrice
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2010, 11:19:04 AM »

Jeff

I think you will be better off doing a clean install using the recovery CD on your new disc, rather than cloning your current system onto it. If you clone, as you say you will simply be copying the gunge, and you will never really clean it up properly. You will have to re-install the programs, but again this is not a bad thing.
I recently did this using an Intel 80gig SSD, and it was the most effective upgrade I've ever done. I kept the old C: drive as a second data disc (I already had one) and I can boot to it by changing the Bios if I need it (I haven't). The SSD is no faster than a spinning disc at large file transfer, what it does is open lots of small files much much faster. This means your programs open faster, and the speed of programs like Lightroom which use lots of thumbnails and sidecar files is amazing. There is no difference in things like Photoshop processing or QImage printing, but Windows Mail is much quicker.
There are no problems using a recovery CD - I did this several times when I was working and it's pretty stress-free.
If you use Photoshop, don't forget to de-activate it first.

The Intel SSD - http://www.ebuyer.com/product/175723


HTH

Brian
« Last Edit: August 28, 2010, 11:37:08 AM by BrianPrice » Logged
rayw
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2010, 03:19:34 PM »

Hi Jeff,

Quote
the current one can be heard working hard almost all the time.

Probably because you have just one disc, with os and page(swap) file on that same disc. Put in the new disc as an additional drive, with a small partition allocated to your page file only (twice the size of your installed ram will be plenty). Remove your imaging programs from c:, and install them on this second disc, in another partition, if you wish. To uninstall the software use this - http://www.revouninstaller.com/revo_uninstaller_free_download.html (with a modicum of care, of course), and defrag your old drive. You can defrag your system files if you use PageDefrag from  www.sysinternals.com

Best wishes,

Ray

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Jeff
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2010, 07:16:39 AM »

Thanks to all for comments.

I have googled SSD's and get the impression it is not advisable to use SSD on other than Win 7, something to do with limiting the number of times the SSD is written too.

So think I will continue with standard SATA's until SSD's have had further development and price drops.

Will get a disk and jump in both feet.

Thanks again

Jeff 
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BrianPrice
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2010, 03:22:03 PM »

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I have googled SSD's and get the impression it is not advisable to use SSD on other than Win 7

Rubbish

Brian
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tonygamble
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« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2012, 03:04:09 PM »

Fred,

You said:-

"I found, for my needs, backup image files are for me.
An image file is a single file backup of your hard drive including the partition and which is stored on a different Hard Drive, in case the C: drive is wearing out."

You said you did this each day and so you could go back several days in case you got a virus or accidentally deleted something you needed.

My understanding is  that each of these image files will be about the same size as what you are storing on your C:

Are you thus storing these Acronis images on quite a large external disk then?

Tony
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Fred A
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« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2012, 05:08:43 PM »

Quote
My understanding is  that each of these image files will be about the same size as what you are storing on your C:

Are you thus storing these Acronis images on quite a large external disk then?

Tony

In my system, and my choice, I choose to make an image backup *almost* daily. I will skip a day here and there if nothing of import was changed or added, but I have no problem making an image backup in 20-22 minutes.
The Acronis program has levels of compression as it makes the back up file. I use the default which I think was medium, where it takes 270 Gigs of C Drive data which includes systems and partitions etc, and saves in on an INTERNAL 3rd Hard drive at 77-82 Gigabyte size files.
I can store 8 backups on my 750 GIG INTERNAL drive. That drive has Acronis BU files.
I have a second 500 gig drive that carries Vista OS but mainly all teh install files, and duplicate picture folders going back 5 years.
Earlier than 5 years are stored on DVDs

I didn't care for backing up regularly to an External dtive. Using USB 2.0, I saw my life slipping away as I waited....
Internal to Internal is my way to go. Fast and Safe as odds of three drives going at once are  about as good as me switching to Light Room.  Smiley

I have my Rescue CDs which allow me to boot in DOS and into Acronis  for Restoring a backed up C drive to a NEW Hard drive.
Even if the mother board went bad. The hard drives are still good.
I also paid a bit extra for the PLUS system which facilitates an install of a restored C: drive to a new computer with perhaps a somewhat different configuration...

So I rely on that. I used to have and use a 300 gig external HD and once a month back up to that in the event of a fire... but then I was too lazy to put that external away somewhere out of harms way.
So I gave it away!

Hope that explains some of the way I set up.

Fred

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tonygamble
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« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2012, 05:18:45 PM »

Thanks Fred,

Which of the various Acronis alternatives do you use? I am not at my machine and able to see them but I seem to remember there are things like incremental and so on.

Off out in a mo' so will pick this up again on Friday.

Tony
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Fred A
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« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2012, 05:31:26 PM »

Quote
Which of the various Acronis alternatives do you use? I am not at my machine and able to see them but I seem to remember there are things like incremental and so on.

I don't use incremental because I back up an Image very often.
Otherwise incremental might fit the bill.
I also don't like the idea of a constantly operating back up system slowing my machine down (even though they swear it doesn't).

Much of me is old fashioned, and some of my thoughts and decisions on safe storage may be antiquated.  I have two friends that swear by Carbonite!!
So talk to younger people.

Fred
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BrianPrice
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« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2012, 10:44:29 AM »

Hi
I have just discovered that my favourite backup program Syncback now has a free version. I used the SE version for years when I was working and still use it now ( I do an incremental backup of everything important automatically on a daily basis), and it has always been 100% reliable. You can set it to email you an error file if anything goes wrong, such as the backup drive not being connected.

http://www.2brightsparks.com/welcome/backup/freeware.html?source=adwords&campaign=syncback-name-search&adgroup=syncback&ad=006&gclid=CMH0yPeMsLMCFczHtAodHC0AVQ

Brian
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Fred A
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« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2012, 11:12:11 AM »

Thank you Brian,
Very handy for backing up various files like my email or pictures ....
It will not back up a C drive or Windows.... message pops up that you may not backup a Drive or windows.

I like Acronis mainly for the catastrophic disaster recovery.
Hard drive fails!  Virus gets embedded somehow!!  Some program installs garbage with it....  Had that recently.... . the deleting of the unwanted origram left teh garbage behind which would not delete.
I simply restore the entire IMAGE of the drive as it was last night or three nights ago.... or...

I don't see any way for this Syncback can do this.
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tonygamble
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« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2012, 11:23:04 AM »

Fred,

I would have thought Incremental would actually be better for a daily backup. The increments being smaller. But who am I to offer advice to someone who has evolved a system he likes and that works?

I did a full backup of my SSD drive C: yesterday afternoon. I have yet to look at the PC and see how much space it took on the external HDD.

EDIT. I have now looked at the disks. The SSD contains 45 gig and the external Acronis backup is 25 gig. For me there is no benefit in doing anything than a full image. I have also set it so the Acronis software turns off the PC when it finishes, so I can run a b/u whenever I leave the studio for the day.

On this, my desk, PC I do an Acronis incremental each night and also a backup using this:-
http://www.karenware.com/powertools/ptreplicator.asp

I've been using it for years. It's handy to have a copy of yesterday's files on this PC in case I delete something in error.

In my studio I use it all the time for backing up selections of folders to other drives - including the one that is never in the studio when I am not there and is thus the ultimate protection against flood, fire and locusts.

Tony
« Last Edit: November 02, 2012, 12:28:48 PM by tonygamble » Logged
Fred A
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« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2012, 04:49:22 PM »

Quote
On this, my desk, PC I do an Acronis incremental each night and also a backup using this:-

Suppose!
Suppose some worm or something like that floated into your computer on the wings of a freeware.
Suppose!   Suppose that the incremental, or differential backup was running in the background. 
Would it back up the worm adding it to the original back up?

I don't really know...
That's why I do a full image backup often, and should something be wrong with yesterday's for some reason... I have a clean full back up from Wednesday, or Tuesday.
Nothing gets added in the background.
That's my thinking... I really do not know any better at this moment, but the principle to me is SAFETY!   
I don't want to worry about what might have been added to my backup.

The other form that some of my friends prefer is the CLONE backup.
The Backup clones the C: drive onto the D: . They are identical. You can grab a folder or a file, or you can even switch plugs on the drive and the D becomes the C and vice versa.

I prefer having a few discrete image backups, in case.... the clone people have all their eggs in one basket with a clone.

Just opinions... I say tomayto and you say tomahto.

Fred
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