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Professional ICC Profiling Software for Windows
Create custom ICC profiles with
Profile Prism for accurate color!
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Author Topic: Canon Pro 100  (Read 1019 times)
Cedar
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« on: June 21, 2020, 01:23:11 AM »

Does Profile Prism work with the Canon Pro 100?  What about other newer printers with more than 4 ink tank colors?  Does the number of colors in the printer make any difference?
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Fred A
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2020, 10:32:40 AM »

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Does Profile Prism work with the Canon Pro 100?  What about other newer printers with more than 4 ink tank colors?  Does the number of colors in the printer make any difference?
Tes, of course. Works with any printer. It accepts a target you printed, with a pre made accurate color target and compares them.
It attempts to set a profile that will help to make your colors accurate.
Theoretically, the more shades of ink, the better, but Profile Prism works with any printer.
Fred
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Cedar
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« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2020, 04:47:34 AM »

Excellent!  So, um....how do Profile Prism's profiles compare to the profiles from the Colormunki, etc.?  Are they just as accurate?  Is Profile Prism more difficult to use?  Is the process more time consuming?  I really like the idea of being able to tweak the profiles, but does that usually wind up being a "hair-pulling" experience?
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Fred A
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« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2020, 10:04:14 AM »

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Excellent!  So, um....how do Profile Prism's profiles compare to the profiles from the Colormunki, etc.?  Are they just as accurate?  Is Profile Prism more difficult to use?  Is the process more time consuming?  I really like the idea of being able to tweak the profiles, but does that usually wind up being a "hair-pulling" experience?
I used Profile prism since day one. I used it to profile papers that were different brands from my printer. I used it to profile papers for which no profiles were made even by the printer / paper manufacturer.
Example" I had a ton of HP Advanced glossy paper that I profiled for a Canon i960, an Epson 1200, and Epson 1800. Was super duper.
I had many off brand..... every time I changed printers, the paper left from old printer was in need of profiling.
So I worked at it and got varying results and found out it was my scanner that was spoiling the scans by color correcting.
So I had to get a plain scanner and I found one. No color correction. (LIDE Canon scanner)
Zowie..
As time went on OEM profiles became common additions to the install kits of the printers. Paper manufacturers began supplying profiles when you bought their paper. So I set out to beat the OEMs, and with a few Epson profiles, I did.
I bought my latest printer a Canon Pro 100 and had boxes of Epson paper left from the old one. Profile Prism to the rescue.
I have a friend with a Spectro who made two profiles for me. One for Epson Ultra Luster, and one for Epson Ultra glossy.
He beat  mine, but surprisingly, not by that much. The Spectrophotometer is the best way to make a profile. But they were not cheap.
Last item: Hair pulling.... I found the scanner that was doing plain raw type scans to be the main ingredient. No tweaking needed after my scan.
Best I can do... maybe others will add their experiences.
Fred
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admin
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« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2020, 01:42:57 PM »

Fred has it right.  The spectrometer profiling tools are a bit more accurate but they are generally more tedious to use as well: you have to run a scanner manually over multiple strips of patches, one row at a time.  With Profile Prism, you can just scan the entire target along with the IT8 and mark the 4 corners of the IT8 and printer target (mark 8 corners) and it develops a profile.  Like Fred said, a scanner with an LED light source is best (like the Canon LiDE series).  If you get a scanner with a typical (fluorescent) light source, you will probably have to do some adjusting afterward due to metamerism: difference in color due to the fluorescent light source.

Regards,
Mike
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Cedar
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« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2020, 06:14:10 PM »

Thanks so much for the info, guys.  So, what about a Canon CanoScan 9000F, would it work good for this?  And would it be advisable to use a VueScan raw scan?
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CHoffman
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« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2020, 02:54:05 PM »

FWIW, I use Profile Prism with my PRO-100 and Red River paper. IMO, the profiles I get are better than the Red River ones for the same printer. My scanner is an old Epson 4490 photo.
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