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Author Topic: Cross-View 3D (Stereo) - can you see this?  (Read 20121 times)
jeffjessee
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« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2011, 02:46:28 PM »

Mike- I just measured the stardard antique Underwood and Underwood cards. The cards, are 7 inches wide, so the photos are a little less, about 6.5 inches wide. I have no problem converging them from about 2 feet away. Guess my head is a little bigger than most, but my eyes aren't 3.25 inches apart, so they are obviously diverging a little. If the pictures are 5 inches wide, it is true that I can view them with less eyestrain. I have seen a lot of other people at the 3D conventions freeviewing the cards, but most of them are old codgers too, so maybe that makes a difference. (Guess we like to look at stuff that's even older than we are.) But they still look a little better in a viewer, as they are magnified. As I'm sure you are aware, the old viewers have a prism effect in the lenses, to converge the images to make viewing easier for the average viewer.

The more modern viewers seem to be designed for viewing 4x6 prints (which they also converge for you), because that's the standard print size. The Loreo camera put the two images on a standard 4x6 shaped print, so that no special processing was required.

Jeff Jessee

Where your 3D will REALLY look good is on a 3DTV. Not all support .MPO files yet, but Panasonic does, just slip in your SD card, and see a glorious 55" 3D scene.

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admin
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« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2011, 11:32:04 PM »

Mike- I just measured the stardard antique Underwood and Underwood cards. The cards, are 7 inches wide, so the photos are a little less, about 6.5 inches wide. I have no problem converging them from about 2 feet away. Guess my head is a little bigger than most, but my eyes aren't 3.25 inches apart, so they are obviously diverging a little.

I'm still having a hard time believing this!  Are you sure you aren't crossing your eyes just slightly instead of diverging them?  That would make an image form in the center and even with a parallel view print, it'd still look 3D but it'd look a little "funky".  I tried diverging my eyes today and I still believe it is impossible and that no one can do it!  I have a clear ruler and put my finger up while looking at clouds miles away.  My finger in the foreground showed two fingers about 2.25 inches apart.  There was nothing I could do to make them move farther apart, which you'd certainly have to do if you are really looking at prints where the centers are separated by over 3 inches.

I still think the cross view method is easier on your eyes too!  You really have to force focus to focus your eyes on something close while your eyes are set at infinity (parallel) because the focus of your eyes is linked naturally to infinity when your eyes are parallel.  Much easier to focus close on something closer.

Do a little investigating: I bet you are crossing your eyes and not diverging them.  It'd give a "backwards" 3D view but it'd still have depth and most people would still think it's 3D.

Mike
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davidh
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« Reply #17 on: April 05, 2011, 03:34:47 AM »

I have always been able to see 3ds with no problem, although it does induce some eye strain after a while.
Once you get the hang of it, it is easy if you hold your hands out about a foot in front of you and adjust the separation between them,you can mask the side views easily and see the one 3d image.
It was a big fad in poster art in the 90s but quickly died out.
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stephenwagner
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« Reply #18 on: April 05, 2011, 04:28:37 AM »

I can free view the old stereo cards in parallel mode with no problem and the depth is normal and not inverted as happens if I use the cross-eyed mode for them. The parallel mode does give a larger image than the cross-eyed mode but is a little harder to fuse the images as another has pointed out.  It does require slight divergence of the eyes, but I've known a number of people over the years who can do it without much effort or eye strain. If I recall correctly, I learned by focusing on something in the distance and then shifting my attention to the card and a single image came into focus. You shouldn't need to strain your eyes to do it -  in fact just the opposite, relax them. For larger images the parallel mode won't work and I have to use the cross-eyed method.

Steve
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Fred A
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« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2011, 10:33:34 AM »


Quote
I tried diverging my eyes today and I still believe it is impossible and that no one can do it!

Well, I cannot do it.!!
Yours truly,

The Cyclops

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jeffjessee
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« Reply #20 on: April 05, 2011, 01:31:09 PM »

There's even a Yahoo group called photo-3d that's been around for many years even before Yahoo, and has lots of "stereo" experts who will answer questions you have if you are getting started in 3D. Also, one for just the Fuji 3d cameras (fuji3d), and one for buying and selling 3d stuff (sell-3d), plus several other, more specialized ones.

3D is fun, and it impresses people. The hardest part is viewing and sharing 3D photos with everyone, but as 3D TV's become more popular and support 3D still formats, that will be the easiest way.

Jeff Jessee
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admin
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« Reply #21 on: April 05, 2011, 01:45:57 PM »

Check this out!

http://www.bgr.com/2011/03/22/sprints-htc-evo-3d-hands-on/

Mike
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