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Author Topic: Out-of-gamut for monitors?  (Read 186 times)
CHoffman
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« on: May 22, 2020, 07:48:01 PM »

Maybe a dumb question, but since we check for out-of-gamut for the printer, can the same thing be done for monitors? I'm pretty sure my PRO-100 covers a wider range than my sRGB monitor, at least in some directions.
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admin
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2020, 11:32:26 PM »

When you activate gamut check in the soft proof, it already accounts for colors that are out of gamut on the printer or the monitor.  If the colors are out of gamut for either, it shows the gamut warning.

Regards,
Mike
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CHoffman
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« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2020, 12:03:43 AM »

Hmmm... Should I care about the difference, or is it not worth worrying about? What if my printer is great but my monitor is a POS?
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Terry-M
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« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2020, 08:30:50 AM »

Quote
What if my printer is great but my monitor is a POS?
Monitors (of a reasonable quality) will have a larger gamut than a printer. See attached screen shot.
The smaller area is for my Epson R2000 with Ilford smooth gloss custom profile. The larger is for my Eizo  monitor which has a gamut that is a little greater than Adobe RGB.
Screen shots show Monitor and Printer; 2nd screen shot shows monitor, Adobe RGB (blue rather faint) and printer
Terry
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 08:42:05 AM by Terry-M » Logged
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« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2020, 03:15:05 PM »

Hmmm... Should I care about the difference, or is it not worth worrying about? What if my printer is great but my monitor is a POS?

Remember that soft proofing is basically an editing tool: the goal is to allow you to see what your print will look like, but on your monitor.  If some colors in your photo are out of gamut on the monitor, those colors cannot be emulated on the monitor and color will be inaccurate in those areas: they may print fine if they are in gamut on the printer but if they are out of gamut on your monitor, the soft proof itself won't represent what the print will look like.  So basically either way (out of gamut for the printer or monitor), you have a problem.  This is why I always drive home the point that you have to understand the limitations of soft proofing and always print to confirm.  Terry and I may have different definitions of "reasonable quality" when it comes to monitors; I think 95% or more will not have an Eizo with a bigger-than-Adobe-RGB gamut as they would consider the price "unreasonable" unless they are a full time photo business.

You could use the new auto intent and not worry about it since that picks perceptual/RC based only on a gamut check of the printer and it ignores the monitor.

Regards,
Mike
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CHoffman
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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2020, 06:26:32 PM »

That's what I like about Qimage. Everything under-the-hood works right even if I don't always understand it!
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