Mike Chaney's Tech Corner
December 05, 2021, 02:49:51 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Feb 2013: Qimage Ultimate Challenges... have fun and explore features!
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  

Professional ICC Profiling Software for Windows
Create custom ICC profiles with
Profile Prism for accurate color!
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: couple questions  (Read 5696 times)
photodude
Newbie
*
Posts: 4


View Profile
« on: August 07, 2009, 06:29:49 PM »

Hi there,

I am really enjoying getting to know qimage - What i use it for the most is printing multiple images to one sheet. For me the advantage is to get true print dimensions  ( ex. true 4x6 dimension on an 8x10 sheet , without the scaling of the picture to fit on a 4x6 sheet)

I use an epson 1400.

My questions are.

1. If I crop the photo in PS and end up with a 4x6 crop, I don't resample it, so my native resolution is around 512 PPI.  Then I go to qimage, in the job properties it show MAX 720, then 360, 180 etc. - If I choose MAX, (then if I understand correctly, qimage will upsize my 4x6 print to 720 PPI and print it)

This feels counter productive to me to upsize a 4x6 print from 512 to 760, Would I be better of using 360 PPI and letting qimage downsample for a 4x6? ( i hope I questioned this clearly)

2nd question, After much looking around online, I am unable to figure out what the Photo RPM setting actually does on the Epson 1400, can anyone point me in the right direction.

Thanks in advance,

Todd
denver CO
Logged
Terry-M
The Honourable Metric Mann
Forum Superhero
*****
Posts: 3214



View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2009, 07:21:16 PM »

Quote
I am really enjoying getting to know qimage - What i use it for the most is printing multiple images to one sheet. For me the advantage is to get true print dimensions
Hi Todd, we're pleased to hear this  Wink

Quote
If I crop the photo in PS and end up with a 4x6 crop
and
Quote
This feels counter productive
Actually, cropping in another program is counter productive, it is not necessary  Wink
Just use your original, un-cropped image in Qimage, set the size to 4x6 (it's one of the standard sizes in the drop-down), adjust the  crop position & zoom in the Full Page Editor and that's it.
You have to get into another mode of thinking with Qimage, forget what you have to in other programs to get a size & crop.

Quote
then if I understand correctly, qimage will upsize my 4x6 print to 720 PPI and print it
That is correct.
To get the best resolution of detail on your print, use 720, especially on a print that will be viewed as a close distance. See the web site for a full explanation http://www.ddisoftware.com/qimage/quality/
Qimage has advanced interpolation algorithms (no other program has anything like it); the 720ppi is the "native" resolution of the printer and by using that, the driver does not "mess around" with the pixels.

Quote
I am unable to figure out what the Photo RPM setting actually does on the Epson 1400
Many Epson printers have this setting, like my R800. Best photo is 2880 dpi and RPM is 5760 dpi. I can, on close inspection, I can see a difference, but for most  work, Best Photo is sufficient, and it's much quicker to print. Note the difference between image pixels per inch (ppi) and printer spray pattern dots per inch (dpi).
I've forgotten what RPM stands for.
Terry.
Logged
Seth
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 322



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2009, 09:43:03 PM »

RPM is Resolution Performance Management.  It isn't any more "management" than Best Photo or Photo.

In simplistic terms:

A little less ink (in most cases) and about the same printing time can be had by using Best Photo and High Speed set to off.

The real understanding of how Epson prints these is an interpolation.  720 as the base resolution moves the paper (for argument's sake) 1/720th of an inch.  1440 moves the paper half as far each time, 2880 slower yet, and so on.  Some brands have a 600 or other dpi base resolution.

Think of a film or flatbed scanner.  They all have "native" optical resolutions.  Finer resolutions are made by stepping the head, film or light source at a lesser rate.
Logged

Seth
<CWO4 (FMF) USN, Ret.>
JayL
Newbie
*
Posts: 9


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2009, 11:49:42 AM »

RPM is Resolution Performance Management.  It isn't any more "management" than Best Photo or Photo.

In simplistic terms:

A little less ink (in most cases) and about the same printing time can be had by using Best Photo and High Speed set to off.

The real understanding of how Epson prints these is an interpolation.  720 as the base resolution moves the paper (for argument's sake) 1/720th of an inch.  1440 moves the paper half as far each time, 2880 slower yet, and so on.  Some brands have a 600 or other dpi base resolution.

Think of a film or flatbed scanner.  They all have "native" optical resolutions.  Finer resolutions are made by stepping the head, film or light source at a lesser rate.

Great info.  Thanks!
Logged
photodude
Newbie
*
Posts: 4


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2009, 02:33:30 AM »

Cool - thanks all for the informative help.

Todd
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!