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Author Topic: Some random questions about Qimage users and usage  (Read 52846 times)
Seth
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« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2009, 11:43:04 AM »

Fred-

Are you talking about the print paper turning yellow or the image? 

UV fading will normally take the yellow ink first, then magenta.  If you are talking ink fading and your cyan and magentas are going first, you may have an environmental issue.
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Seth
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Fred A
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« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2009, 12:07:28 PM »

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If you are talking ink fading and your cyan and magentas are going first, you may have an environmental issue.

Must be the sulfur in the well water for the sprinklers.  Cheesy Grin
Fred
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Seth
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« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2009, 12:37:46 PM »

Fred-

There are two others that really exceed Epson:
Harman Gloss FB AL Baryta available at Red River, etc.
From Uwe at Outback http://www.outbackprint.com/papers/paper_directory/Harman_FB_Gloss.html

Also, Red River's own 66lb. Arctic Polar™ Gloss at http://www.redrivercatalog.com/browse/66lb-arctic-polar-gloss.html
A bright white, high gloss, optimized for pigments.  Free ICCs.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2009, 09:15:36 PM by Seth » Logged

Seth
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Fred A
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« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2009, 03:23:34 PM »

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Harman Inkjet Gloss FB AL

Seth we have no disagreement on two planes.
1) Paper selection is totally subjective,
2) Whether the paper you cite is better than Epson prem glossy or not is up for debate.
3) You have to put a cost limit on anything like this discussion.  The paper you suggested is double the cost of Epson Prem Glossy.
Like saying there are better cars than a Caddy. Try a Bentley or a Ferrari.
Such as it is....
Fred
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Liz Z.
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« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2009, 04:05:37 PM »

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Harman Gloss FB AL Baryta

Seth,

I was curious, so I followed the link to the Harman web page. There seem to be two variations on this paper, one called Warmtone and the other lacking this designation. Which one are you using?

Liz
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Mark Raymond
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« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2009, 08:50:03 PM »

I use it for personal and business use.

The most important aspect for me is the ability to call up previously saved jobs and have everything--print layout, printer settings, sharpening, etc.--automatically set up.  Someone calls and says they want xyz print: All I need to do is recall the the job, load the printer and go.

That actually brings up a question, but I can start a new topic for that.

Mark
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Seth
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« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2009, 09:33:05 PM »

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Harman Gloss FB AL Baryta
I was curious, so I followed the link to the Harman web page. There seem to be two variations on this paper, one called Warmtone and the other lacking this designation. Which one are you using?

Sorry, Liz, maybe a misconception.  I have tried Harman but use the Red River product (and EPson).  Not because it is better.  I just like to minimize sources.  I use RR because they have pre-scored cards, panorama pre-cut sheets so I don't have to use roll paper, etc.

The other papers I use are from Hawk Mountain.  They will actually let you send a target from your paper/ink/printer combination and do a free profile. 

One place I would also direct you to is http://www.cjcom.net/articles/digiprn5.htm and read Clayton's eval on papers based on dMax, whiteness, brighteners, etc.

BTW-
Hawk and RR have sample packs that are worth getting.  Order two to play with.

One more thing.  I RARELY print gloss or pearl/semi-gloss on inkjet.  I use various matte papers so I get better archivability and display longevity (not the same.)

I do use heavy gloss paper for color laser photos, but this is Cast Coat and others that will take the heat factor.  (I get into that in Harald John's book Mastering Digital Printing.  The laser prints are even more permanent and have a different effect.)
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Seth
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Seth
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« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2009, 10:00:12 PM »

The most important aspect for me is the ability to call up previously saved jobs and have everything--print layout, printer settings, sharpening, etc.--automatically set up.  Someone calls and says they want xyz print: All I need to do is recall the the job, load the printer and go.

That actually brings up a question, but I can start a new topic for that.

Mark-

There is a "save as job" option.  Is it not saving everything you need?

Seth
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Seth
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Mark Raymond
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« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2009, 12:11:49 AM »

There is a "save as job" option.  Is it not saving everything you need?

No problem on that Seth, but thanks. 

I just purchased a new printer and my question involved transitioning over 100 jobs that were created with the old printer.   I think I answered my own question:  Whatever you do, don't uninstall the old printer and profiles until the old jobs have been converted to the new printer!

Mark
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2009, 11:09:03 AM »

Fred-

Are you talking about the print paper turning yellow or the image? 

UV fading will normally take the yellow ink first, then magenta.  If you are talking ink fading and your cyan and magentas are going first, you may have an environmental issue.

Optical Brightener (OBA) fading in the paper coating and possibly the paper itself will shift the paper from cool white to warm white. Depending on the quality of the OBAs used, their presence in the coating and/or the paper itself you will see that yellowing happen. As they are basically dyes they will fade when exposed to visible and UV light and if not protected by RC barriers fade to gas (Ozone mainly) too.


met vriendelijke groeten, Ernst Dinkla

Try: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Wide_Inkjet_Printers/
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Fred A
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« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2009, 11:31:13 AM »

Thanks Ernst
Next time I replace a print that has been hanging for years, I will have a closer look.
They were dye ink prints from an Epson 1280.
So far the pigment prints from my R1800 printed in 2007, still pert and perky.
The frames are cheapo s, and the "glass" is really not glass, but acrylic. I would have to check, but it is likely that UV passes through that stuff?Huh?
As to Ozone, not much of that in the house, but plenty of Methane.
Fred  Grin Embarrassed

Looking in Wikipedia, I found this:
 Answer

In short, your initial assumptions are flawed. Every different chemical compound will allow light of some wavelengths to pass through, and will absorb some other wavelengths. In the case of glass and many acrylic polymers, they both appear to be clear because most of the light in the visible spectrum passes through. It is not generally true that glass allows infrared light to pass through, nor is it generally true that acrylic polymers will allow ultraviolet light to pass through. The infrared light absorbed by both acrylic and glass heats up the material by causing bending, stretching, and twisting of mmolecular bonds. The ultraviolet light absorbed by these materials generally causes ionization.
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Seth
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« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2009, 12:26:29 PM »

Fred- Dunno who wrote that stuff at Wiki, but-

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Every different chemical compound will allow light of some wavelengths to pass through, and will absorb some other wavelengths.

Or, in the case of solids, reflect or absorb.  Duh! That's what causes color--or the lack thereof.

Quote
...nor is it generally true that acrylic polymers will allow ultraviolet light to pass through.
Totally bollocks.  It depends on the type and composition of the acrylic.  If the statement were true, nikon SB-xxx, canon ef-xxx, etc. wouldn't put out UV when they go off.

Many acrylics will plasticize out.  This is the event that is deadly to photos, papers, etc. especially silver-based.

Long term museum (read: archival) storage by encapsulation is done in true Mylar sheet.

BTW- I don't use wood frames, especially the cheap laminated particle board stuff.  They have their own issues.

Seth
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Seth
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tomc
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« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2009, 02:45:59 PM »

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"But I wonder how many people there are out there who actually do home printing with multiple images on a page?"

An example: I take photos at events for the county historical society and give them disks of both raw and jpeg images for their archives. I also select some representative images and use the full page editor to add and place multiple images on 13x19 prints. They can display these for people to see a summary of the event.


Tom
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redzuk
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« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2009, 07:29:51 PM »

Sometimes i'll put put two 5x7's on a 8x10 paper and print them.  It sure is a great feature, i dont use it much though.   

 I bought qimage because everyone over at dpreveiw was going on about the sharpening.  I accepted the old school idea of only printing once and only as the very last step, so it made sense to sharpen in the program that you use to send the file to the printer.  I'm more of the new school three step sharpening system now.  Sharpen by USM once at the beginning to undue the softness created by the camera's anti aliasing filter.  Add  "creative" selective sharpening to specific area of photo ( that would require studio version I think), and output sharpening that will overcome any blurring caused during printing (easily done with smart sharpening). 

I dont really print much, i'm going to try to change that and print something at least every couple of weeks. Nothing is more frustrating than making a print and finding the inks dried up and clogged something because the printer has sat idle for months.

Carl   

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Liz Z.
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« Reply #29 on: July 23, 2009, 07:34:57 PM »

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I bought qimage because everyone over at dpreview was going on about the sharpening.

Interesting--I have never even thought about the sharpening that Qimage does, and I knew nothing about a three step process!

Liz
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