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Author Topic: QimageOne Soft Proofing question  (Read 1424 times)
Mubajad38
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« on: December 24, 2020, 01:38:46 PM »

Hello everyone.
When soft proofing in Qimage One I can select "out of gamut"  (when soft proofing).
Then I see parts of the image where colours are out of gamut.
So far so good.

But my question now is:
Is it possible to make those colours IN gamut within Qimage One?
The point is, that I do not use any Adobe products (no Lightroom or Photoshop anymore).

I' m using DXO PL4 as my main raw converter. No soft proofing in there.

For now the only possibility I see, is opening both DXO PL4 and Qimage One.
And then, if there are any out of gamut areas in my image (showing in QimageOne).....go back to DXO PL....work on that (let' s say master)file...export again to Qimage One...and hope it' s in gamut (because I work " in the blind" in PL).... If not.....I have to do that same process again...and maybe again.....
Not really a efficient workflow.

I hope there are other ways to do this.

Thank you for your advice!
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« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2020, 02:04:44 PM »

Not in Qimage One as Qimage One doesn't have image editing capabilities; it's only for the printing stage.  With that said, I have never found the need to try to "force" out-of-gamut areas in-gamut.  The reason being: those areas will be forced in-gamut at the printing stage anyway and I've not found any consistent way to beat the color management engine at doing that.  Most of the time when you edit an image trying to get out-of-gamut areas in-gamut, you end up adversely affecting other areas of the image that don't need modifying.  By simply choosing perceptual (scale "down" colors across the whole image) or relative colorimetric (only bring the out-of-gamut areas in range with others unaffected), you can almost always choose which look you prefer without trying to use manual edits.  There are rare cases where manual edits would be better to tweak one specific color but in general, you are better off letting the color management engine (profiles) take care of those areas automatically.

I mention this because I've seen some people who feel like they have to edit every image in soft proof mode just to try to get everything (or most areas) in gamut.  If you look at their work compared to just reprinting with either perceptual/RC intents, their manual tweaking is worse 95 times out of 100.

Regards,
Mike
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Mubajad38
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« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2020, 05:10:18 PM »

Thank you very much Mike! That' s VERY useful information. Also a relief.
 I just tried getting an image in gamut (in Affinity Photo). Then exported to Qimage One.
And...you' re right...the result on a Fine Art Hahnemuhle Bamboo paper is definitely (much) worse.
Why use in gamut button at all, in that case? Such a button only for those rare cases?

I print somewhat serious since the beginning of this year. Love it!
I really like the matte textured papers from Hahnemühle (Photo Rag/Museum Etching/Bamboo)
Still learning about Relative Colorimetric and Perceptual. I know the theory behind it.
I don' t think there's a general rule for using one over the other (every image needs a different approach ofcourse).
But then again, I ' m not quite sure if there' s anything to say about glossy vs matte and the usage of Relative Colorimetric and Perceptual....in general :-)
Thank you very much. I don' t think I' ll use that Out of Gamut button again.
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« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2020, 06:44:55 PM »

I only use the out of gamut indication in rare cases where a deep blue shirt comes out a little purple in the print or something of that nature.  Then if I check the out-of-gamut colors, I can see why it might be shifted a little (relative colorimetric can do that in color extremes).  At that point, I might reprint with perceptual intent to see if I like that better.  I usually print in relative colorimetric intent unless I see a problem (which is pretty rare).  Then if the colors in question are out of gamut, I might try perceptual intent instead.

Mike
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Mubajad38
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« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2020, 06:52:58 PM »

Thnxs again!. Do you print on fine art matte papers as well? Papers with a more natural white (no whiteners and more “yellow”/ darker).
What about monochrome images? Would it matter there?
Well I guess I’ll just have to try and practice more.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2020, 06:56:20 PM by Mubajad38 » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2020, 07:18:03 PM »

I do print on some matte papers including fine art.  They are actually more challenging because they have a lower dynamic range (read less vibrant colors) than semigloss or gloss.  Out of gamut can happen with B/W images but it is typically limited to deep shadows where the ink can't get black enough to represent really dark shades.  That's really a different "kind" of out of gamut though because black point compensation will take care of that.

Mike
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