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Author Topic: Which Interpolation Type Do You Use?  (Read 7089 times)
jbhaber
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« on: February 27, 2010, 03:25:08 PM »

I'm interested in learning more about Interpolation Types. I've always settled on Hybrid SE because the user guide says it's based on the#1 best choice of Hybrid, plus it's faster and smoother.

I use an Epson R1800 and have been pleased with my results. However, I'm wondering if I should be choosing a different type of Interpolation Type based on the kind of photo, media, etc. that I'm printing.

So, I'm wondering, which Interpolation Type do you use?

Thanks.
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JB Haber

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Fred A
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2010, 03:40:14 PM »

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So, I'm wondering, which Interpolation Type do you use?
The best way to check is to make a print using each type.
I use Hybrid. The SE is a little finer with no artifacts allowed. This is done for purity at the sacrifice of a slightly softer image.
Make two prints.
Fred
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Owen Glendower
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2010, 05:06:26 AM »

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The best way to check is to make a print using each type.

Speaking of which, here's a question (not too far OT, I hope) for Qimage users: When was the last time you "tested" Qimage by printing an image with NO interpolation?

I did, recently, by accident, when I was setting up a new printer.  The last setup step was a test print.  I stuck some of the sample 4x6 paper in the photo tray and picked an image (about a 15% crop) which I had previously printed 8x10 on the old printer.  At a quick glance, looked okay.  So I printed it 8x10 so I could compare apples with apples...and was absolutely horrified at the result.  Nowhere near the quality I had gotten from the old printer.

After 10 minutes of holding my head in my hands, I realized that the last thing I had printed from Qimage had been on plain paper, no interpolation, just to verify position.  Re-printed using Hybrid SE and got the quality I had expected.  The new print also confirmed that the HP B8550 was a distinct step up from the old Deskjet 9650...from which I got pretty good prints, using Qimage.

The difference between the no-interpolation print and the Hybrid SE print is painfully obvious.  I then went back and took a closer look at the no-interpolation 4x6 test print.  The difference doesn't jump off the page, as it does with the 8x10's, but it's easily visible upon close examination.

I've printed full-frame images at 8x10 with and without interpolation and have been hard-pressed to see the difference.  But if you're printing large, Qimage's interpolation makes an easily-visible difference.  Easy to forget that until you print without it.
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jbhaber
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2010, 04:37:44 PM »

I printed an image using both Hybrid and Hybrid SE and noticed no difference at 12"x16". The photo is a little soft to begin with, so I think I'll find a nice sharp photo and test it again.
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JB Haber

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Fred A
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2010, 04:43:51 PM »

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Hybrid and Hybrid SE and noticed no difference at 12"x16"
It has been so long since I played with SE vs Hybrid, bit I think I recall that a severely cropped image set to print 12 x 16 might show the difference more readily.
Fred
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admin
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2010, 05:28:56 PM »

I printed an image using both Hybrid and Hybrid SE and noticed no difference at 12"x16". The photo is a little soft to begin with, so I think I'll find a nice sharp photo and test it again.

It can be tough to see, actually.  You'd have to print a sharp photo with a lot of fine detail to see the difference.  If you have a portrait shot of someone with a ruddy complexion, some wrinkes, freckles, a 5 o'clock shadow, etc. and  you don't want to accentuate the fine details, SE comes out a little smoother/softer in those instances.  That's really what it was designed for.

Mike
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Owen Glendower
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2010, 01:12:49 PM »

Thanks for this info, Mike.

In the situation you describe, would this also be a good time to dial the Sharpness Equalizer to the max?  I've read your article on the subject, but I'm still not 100% clear on when and how much to use this feature.
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