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Author Topic: How to make a normal thermal printer to print wide format  (Read 10685 times)
oj
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« on: February 27, 2010, 07:24:40 PM »

Hey!

I have this wonderful challenge.

How to make a normal thermal printer ( output 2inches*7 inches) to print on wide format.

1) How to change it physically so that it prints on a 120 inch * 320 inch wide paper.

2) Can Qimage be used to achieve the task.

Cheers,
Oj
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rayw
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2010, 08:53:36 PM »

Hi Oj,

If it is your challenge, then you sort it out.  Cheesy If it is my challenge, then I will sort it out. Do you want to pay me now?

I can give you some help to get you started. All you need are a few components, and a handful of logic statements, then when you've written the printer driver routines, Qimage will sort it out for you.

You need to start with examining the print head. If you know for example, that it has a basic dpi of 400, and it operates on 5V, then you have at least a couple of options.

1) using a very fine saw, slice the head into sections, and spread them over a 120 by 320 area. This will not give you such a fine basic dpi, but by dithering, and skilful application of software, then this physical handicap can be resolved.

2) alternatively you have, from the first assumption, 5 volts giving enough energy for the head to print 14 square inches. Now you want to cover an area of 38400 inches square so you will need  a voltage of about 2742.857142857etc. volts. This is normally far too high, so you need to obtain a phase reluctance inductive capacitorsionator, to a value of 29.9 MG. If you decide to drive the printhead at he higher voltage, without using a pric, then instead of getting a nicely rendered large print, you are likely to get a single small black spot in the corner, where the print head used to be.

hth. Grin

Best wishes,

Ray
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oj
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2010, 11:52:12 AM »

Hey Ray,

Thanks for such a fast reply! Appreciate it.

Approx how long would it take you to build it. Say to print on a 60 inch * 180 inch thermal paper.

Cheers,
Oj
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rayw
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2010, 12:09:45 PM »

Hi OJ,

Well, it depends on you finding a big enough pric. There aren't any this side of the pond, we exported ours years ago.

Best wishes,

Ray
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oj
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2010, 08:40:09 PM »

Hey Ray,

From where can we get a pric?

And how much would the whole operation cost to build ...around 150$.

Cheers,
Ojas
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daniellouwrens
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2010, 11:53:36 PM »

Hi

I thinks he is having a go at you....   Kiss
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rayw
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2010, 12:33:31 AM »

Hi Ojas,

Well, I did try our local superstore. I approached a likely looking salesperson, and asked If he had any old prics in the store. he looked at me and said, 'We've got one now'.

best wishes,

Ray
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admin
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« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2010, 03:52:30 AM »

You need to start with examining the print head. If you know for example, that it has a basic dpi of 400, and it operates on 5V, then you have at least a couple of options.

1) using a very fine saw, slice the head into sections, and spread them over a 120 by 320 area. This will not give you such a fine basic dpi, but by dithering, and skilful application of software, then this physical handicap can be resolved.

2) alternatively you have, from the first assumption, 5 volts giving enough energy for the head to print 14 square inches. Now you want to cover an area of 38400 inches square so you will need  a voltage of about 2742.857142857etc. volts. This is normally far too high, so you need to obtain a phase reluctance inductive capacitorsionator, to a value of 29.9 MG. If you decide to drive the printhead at he higher voltage, without using a pric, then instead of getting a nicely rendered large print, you are likely to get a single small black spot in the corner, where the print head used to be.

I've read your specifications, however, I believe after doing the math that if such a device were to do the actual printing, at least part of the printhead would be traveling faster than the speed of light.  My fear is that in doing so, a micro black hole may be created that could envelop the earth.  In addition, as the printhead approaches the speed of light, its mass will approach infinity.  Also not a good combination for those of us here on earth.

There is an easier solution: one that doesn't risk all life on our planet.  Since Qimage can print posters, just enter the size you like and Qimage will create a 60 x 46 page print that you can piece together.  Just make sure you have 2760 sheets loaded before you begin printing!

Cheesy

Mike
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oj
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« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2010, 09:17:46 AM »

Hey Mike,

The challenge is to print on a single piece of paper, 60*180 inches with a thermal printer.

The thermal printer can be changed physically to adapt to the challenge.

Qimage will do the software part, now the hardware needs to adapt to the change.

Do you know a smart way to change the hardware to print on a large paper.

Cheers,
Oj



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oj
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2010, 09:21:45 AM »

Hey Ray,

So you can actually start building one?

Cheers,
Oj
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oj
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2010, 10:45:47 AM »

Hey Ray and Mike,

Check this youtube video out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4Rrsfe__yU .

I have this in mind. Here they use an ink based printer.

Is it possible that we could change the orientation of a thermal printer and make it print like that.

Cheers,
Oj

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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2010, 11:23:16 AM »

Hey Ray and Mike,

Check this youtube video out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4Rrsfe__yU .

I have this in mind. Here they use an ink based printer.

Is it possible that we could change the orientation of a thermal printer and make it print like that.

Cheers,
Oj



Inkjet printing started with that kind of label, address, package, printing. In the 1950's.

Talk with HP. They have development packages for heads like that
http://h10088.www1.hp.com/cda/gap/display/main/index.jsp?zn=gap&cp=20000-13698-13855-14056^203091_4041_100__

The heads used on the B9180, Z3100, Z3200 are also used in a dual assembly version on the Z6100 that goes 60" wide.
And in a multi head static head assembly for their Web wide printing equipment:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EV178ClWSus

Related thermoheads on the Latex printer:
http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/press_kits/2009/SGIA2009/HP_Designjet_L25500_Fact_Sheet.pdf

If they can't help you come back here.


met vriendelijke groeten, Ernst Dinkla

Try: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Wide_Inkjet_Printers/
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rayw
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« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2010, 11:41:19 AM »

Hi Oj,

I could build, or get built, anything, if I want to, and enough money is thrown at the problem. Your proposed printer is likely to cost a bit more than $150.00 in final production.  The development cost is likely to be a few million dollars. Then, it will take more than that to make me want to take on the job. I expect you should think of a similar cost for Mike to develop the software interface to the printer. You will need to prepare a detailed requirements engineering specification. If you do not know how to do that, then you will need to hire someone that does, or pay me to ask you lots of questions.

Another aspect, Like Rolls Royce cars used to be, I chose my customers. You will have to prove yourself worthy of my consideration. As I get older, I find that gets more difficult.

Finally, assuming I were to take on the project, my terms and conditions are simple but strict. Strictly cash up front, the design, patents, copyright, etc. belong to me. The item is not to be re-badged, resold or altered in any way without my written agreement.

I expect you will find a supplier more suited to your requirements, I believe a few folk in China are looking for work.

Best wishes,

Ray


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oj
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« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2010, 11:00:11 AM »

Hey Ernest,

Thanks for the info...found it very helpful.

I want to know...is there anyway I could build a thermal printer that prints on a large paper.

This video  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4Rrsfe__yU .  gives a hint as to how.

But I need to use the same process to print on a large paper using a thermal printer.

Cheers,
Ojas
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